One of the great things about the blogosphere is that even when several bloggers are writing about the same story, they’re covering different angles. Here are a couple of examples of posts that complement our posts from the past week:

As a complement to Revere’s post on the FDA’s cefquinome decision, check out The Olive Ridley Crawl for a list of five reasons the approval is unnecessary and Mike the Mad Biologist to learn why cefepime-resistant salmonella is only the tip of an infection iceberg.

As a complement to David Michaels’s post on antioxidants and cancer, learn how antioxidants might be increasing cancer (if the findings of the recent article are true) from Abel Pharmboy at Terra Sigillata.

On a less TPH-centric note, here are other blog highlights from the past week:

The Examining Room of Dr. Charles explains the association between breast cancer and a mouse virus. 

Laura H. Kahn at The Bulletin Online warns about the dangers of having Homeland Security doing biothreat research.

David Roberts at Gristmill tackles the moral aspects climate change, considering mitigation vs. adaptation – and, in breaking news, he has the list of members on the new House committee on global warming.

Aman at Technology, Health & Development has a roundup devoted to the Social Enterprise Conference. From that list, I especailly enjoyed posts by Catherine Laine at AIDG and Bill Shore at Sharing Witness about a presentation by Victoria Hale, whose nonprofit pharmaceutical company Institute for One World Health focuses on diseases that disproportionately affect developing countries.

Timothy Noah at Slate uses the analogy of privatized national defense to point out the craziness of the U.S. health insurance system (hat tip to The Examining Room of Dr. Charles).

Mead Over at Global Health Policy explains some of the risks behind different malaria prevention measures, and one possible method for dealing with them.

Matt Madia at Reg Watch reports on the EPA Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee’s action on ground-level ozone standards.

Andrea Lynch at RH Reality Check updates us on the saga of U.S. restrictions on international HIV/AIDS prevention funds.

Roy M. Poses MD at Health Care Renewal highlights the idea of what it means to serve on a board of directors, with one post about the responsibilities (fulfilled or not) of hospital board members, and another about a med school dean joining PepsiAmerica’s board.

What else deserves a read? Add suggestions in the comments.